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AFT-Oregon elects Jaime Rodriguez as President

On July 1, 2019, Jamie Rodriguez began his term as the new AFT-Oregon President. Jaime has been a long time active member of Local 2277, Portland Community College Federation of Faculty and Academic Professionals, in addition to serving as AFT-Oregon's VP of Political Action since 2014. AFT-Oregon members and staff welcome Jaime and are looking forward to his leadership, inspiration, and passion for labor advocacy.

2021 AFT-Oregon Scholarships and Awards

 

AFT-Oregon SCHOLARSHIPS and AWARDS are now open and accepting applications for 2021.

The deadline for applications has been extended to February 14, 2021.

Apply Now!

 

SCHOLARSHIPS

AFT members dive into candidate endorsement process

As the presidential elections inch closer and the field of candidates gets more and more competitive, AFT members are engaging, parsing campaign platforms, asking questions of the candidates, and voicing their priorities as educators, healthcare practitioners and public employees. Thus far, the AFT has hosted eight AFT Votes town halls in eight different locations across the country, giving members the opportunity to meet candidates in person and hear about their stands on education, working families, healthcare and other top-line issues. Also part of the AFT’s robust endorsement process: surveys, debate parties and lots of information on AFTVotes.org.

Weingarten: Educators must save democracy

“Teachers have always had power,” AFT President Randi Weingarten told the crowd at the TEACH opening plenary Thursday afternoon. “We need to own our power. And we need to build our power so we can move our agenda—for our students and our families; for safe, welcoming and well-funded public schools; for affordable higher education; healthcare that is a right, not a privilege; a living wage; a decent retirement; a healthy climate and a strong democracy.”

Best economy ever?

In AFT President Randi Weingarten’s latest column in the New York Times, she writes that, despite President Trump’s claims that we have the “best economy ever,” his policies are harming working and middle-class Americans, many of whom are struggling just to get by. “Our political and economic systems are so weighted toward the wealthy that opportunity will only come through the power of collective action,” she writes, using “the surest vehicles to increase opportunity for ordinary Americans”—public education, labor unions and voting. Read the full column.

AFT launches massive national campaign to fund public education

The AFT’s long-time advocacy for public schools has just been turbo-charged, with a sweeping, multi-pronged campaign to fund the future of American public education. Amid the continuing wave of teacher activism shining a spotlight on massive shortfalls in education investment, the Fund Our Future initiative aims to take the teachers’ megaphone into Congress, statehouses and communities nationwide.

Never again

“A majority of American teens say they are worried about a shooting happening at their school. Let that sink in,” AFT President Randi Weingarten writes in her latest column for the New York Times. “Young people are demanding meaningful action beyond ‘thoughts and prayers.’ They know, as do law enforcement officers and educators, that there are effective ways to address gun violence.” Read more about the proven strategies that would enhance school safety and reduce gun violence.
 

On the Passing of Deirdre Mackey, AFT-Oregon Staff Member

It is with great sadness that we share the passing of AFT-Oregon staff member Deirdre Mackey, along with her daughter Grace, from a traffic accident on December 25, 2017. 
 
Deirdre was warm and caring, always willing to help a coworker—or a stranger—at a moment's notice. She brought that same love to her work at AFT-Oregon as our Program Coordinator and Financial Specialist. Deirdre was a skilled project manager and all-around talent, committed to social justice and the union movement. She was our friend.
 

Cutting the heart out of higher ed

Betsy DeVos wants to alter the DNA of higher education, trying to change the definition of the credit hour, eliminate student-faculty interaction in some programs and allow schools losing their accreditation to charge students tuition. And it’s all disguised in the wonky and overwhelming “negotiated rulemaking” review process that begins Jan. 15.